Term Paper Writing For College/University

Any school, college or university student who is in the process of obtaining a graduate degree will have to submit a term paper, often referred to as a research paper, thesis or dissertation, to the department and the college, for evaluation. Proofreading is very important. Dissertations play an important role in determining an individual’s completion and final outcome of their degree. They are accounted along with the individual’s final grades. If you are panicking about writing your dissertation, then here are a few tips and study skills to help you go about writing the dissertation and excel in it with flourishing results.

This 8-point simple and univocal approach eases the work of the researcher.

1. The student should pick out an interesting topic that is included in the syllabus.

2. After choosing the topic, this topic should then be analysed for all material available about it in books, articles or on the Internet. For example, if a Psychology student prefers to study ‘Emotional maturity of youth’ then the individual will have to look through information surrounding emotions, maturity, effects of immaturity, and effects of being matured.

3. After analysing and understanding the topic, research sources like the literature review mean studies done previously on the same topic should be identified.

4. Process of organisation as to which of the old researches should be used and which unreliable resources should not be used can be done.

5. After collecting and organising the information, the researcher should read through this information and must start with the editing. Editing will take place in the notations like changing of speech, grammatical mistakes, proper alignment and a continuity check.

6. The researcher should then be able to prepare the outline of the research paper he or she is in the process of completing. By preparing the outline, references can be easily identified.

7. After preparing for the outline of the research paper, the individual should compose or construct the outline and go about it despite the presence of errors, which are natural for anyone.

8. When all of the above said steps are accomplished, the person is ready to edit the rough draft that has errors, and will then be in a position to submit the final draft to the supervisor on time.

By abiding and obliging to the above-mentioned steps, the individual will never have regrets later for having low grades in the final semester.

Writing a Dissertation at College or University

Almost all universities require students to undertake a piece of independent research. This is often referred to as a dissertation or thesis. Because the dissertation relies more on the initiative of the student, and because it is usually a substantial piece of work, it often causes students a great deal of stress. Here are some hands-on tips to help you tackle the dissertation.

Tip 1: Start early – do not delay in getting the dissertation under way. A little bit done on a regular basis really does make all the difference. Set aside two to three hours a week to begin with. In no time at all you will have made substantial progress, which will serve to motivate you even further.

Tip 2: No data = no dissertation. While ideally the research process requires you to come up with a topic and then decide what data you need, in the real world I would never embark on a research project without first considering access to data. In many instances it makes sense to start with reflecting on what data might be relatively easily available to you that you could build a dissertation around.

Tip 3: Starting early means starting to write early too! Some tutors give the advice that you ‘write-up’ the dissertation at the end. This is nonsense. It does not matter if you have to redraft your work, 99% of writers do this. The dissertation is something that should come together gradually. The process or writing itself will get you to think through the material you have been reading and working on.

Tip 4: Make sure the data analysis and interpretation are linked to the literature review. To do so the literature review needs to have clear themes, or better still a theoretical framework (a collection of key concepts and how these relate to one another). Remember that your study needs to relate to the body of knowledge that already exists.

Tip 5: Tell the reader what your aim and objectives are and then in the conclusion tell them how you have met them. People who mark lengthy pieces of work often start by trying to get an overview of it. One way of doing this is to read the introduction and then the conclusion. You should make it clear to the reader that you have done what you said you set out to do. It is surprising how often students fail to do this!

Tips For Writing a University-Level Essay

When you take the bold step to commence a university undergraduate course you are moving into a new realm of education, which in turn requires you to deliver a new level of academic work. This will involve giving presentations, completing research and writing university level essays. In order to meet the requirements of these essays there are a number of tips that you should follow which should set you on the track to academic success.

Firstly, remember that university essays should be well researched and contain lots of supporting evidence in terms of other people's previous findings. This supporting evidence could be in the form of a literature review or just quoting others' work throughout your essay. Any references to other resources must be credited appropriately. Be sure to follow your university's specific guidelines in this respect as valuable marks can possibly be lost just by not applying the correct referencing method, or by applying the right method incorrectly. It may pay to familiarize yourself with whichever style your university uses, before you even begin writing. A common referencing style is the Harvard system of referencing which has very strict rules about crediting authors, research papers and journals etcetera but your university should be able to provide you with tailored guidance.

Secondly, a university level essay should try to delve deeper than a college level essay necessarily would. It should stretch and question theories and allow you to add your own knowledge and opinions in order to draw conclusions, some of which may never have been drawn before. This means you can't just recite your lecture notes, there must be some individual application of knowledge, and this is a challenge that many new undergraduates struggle with.

As with all essays a university level essay should have a sound introduction, a thorough research and analysis section and sound conclusions. This should then be followed by a full reference list and a bibliography. Within all of these elements you should make sure that you format your work according to your university guidelines, this is good practice for when you come to writing your dissertation, as correct formatting and adherence to style guidelines could mean the difference between a first and a 2: 1, in the same way, any essay, whether written at university or college should be proofread, preferably by a third party, to ensure that it is free from any spelling or grammar mistakes. Following all of these tips will allow your university level essays to achieve the grades you deserve and give you a good foundation for when it comes to writing your dissertation.

Tips for Writing College Essays: Literary Analysis

Writers block. Talk about the number one time waster when it comes to studying and assignment completion in college. And let's be realistic here, it isn't just WRITER'S block, it is really PROJECT CREATOR'S block. Whether we are writing a paper, creating a PowerPoint presentation, a short video production, a website, or any time of major project in an English course, we eventually hit that brick wall of saying "what do I do next?"

Well, if you are participating in any sort of English class, whether it is literature, critical theory … etc. There is a good chance that you will run out of the creative juices at some point. The problem is that it can sometimes take FOREVER to get back in track, when you really just want to get the project done fast . So here's a quick set of steps you can take to get the creative ideas flowing again.

Consider the Big Picture

Just ask yourself the following question about the (literary analysis) topic you chose to write about.

What are the primary themes or big ideas that are represented in the text (s) I'm concerned with?

Simple, right? If you have narrowed the focus of your paper well enough, you hopefully don't have more than three of these. And those three should honestly be bridging up to an even bigger, singular idea. Anyway, take those ideas or that idea and take the next simple step.

Symbol Identification

English classes, and especially literature courses, are largely representing philosophy and world views (culture) through metaphor. This means that you can have a lot of creativity in your interpretation of a text. And you really can't be wrong, as long as you make a compelling argument for it. But here's the key to overcoming that writer's block …

Symbols are a KEY metaphorical tool of authors!

So, simply pick out some symbol – whether it is a character, a description, an item … etc. – that helps explain the text's or texts' attitude toward that big idea. Now you can get into an elaboration of a particular symbol and big idea within your writing. At this point, find a few quotes surrounding that symbol that help back up your position, and you've just crunched out another 250+ words in your paper. Also, add your own elaborations after each quote to explain how the quotes prove your argument.

Not only is this a great way to add some more description and elements to your paper, this same process can be used as a way to create your thesis statement:

– Just look for the big ideas,

-Find a symbol (or a few) that make a statement about that big idea,

-Then argue that the symbol represents your author's viewpoint on the big idea.

-Or maybe the author is satirizing that viewpoint. Use your own discretion here.