College Campus Pavement Maintenance Tips

Colleges and Universities all across the country experience massive increases in enrollment with every passing semester. This exponential growth, although incredible, has also led such campuses to struggle with routine structural upkeep. One of the most unintentionally neglected areas are paved surfaces. This includes parking lots, sidewalks, curbs, ADA ramps, stairs, basketball courts, tennis courts, plazas, courts, and more.

College campus pavement maintenance is important in order to keep the campus looking attractive and worth its tuition. However, the most important part of pavement maintenance for colleges is safety. Crumbling or uneven pavement can cause slip, trip, and fall accidents, while faded paint lines and symbols can cause car collisions, bicycle accidents, and pedestrian injuries. Continue reading to learn the most effective and recommended ways to maintain your student campus, responsibly and within budget.

Pedestrian Comfort and Safety

Unkempt pavement will eventually begin to show signs of deterioration and lack of performance. Crumbling stairs, uneven surfaces, and degraded curbs are all danger zones for anyone not paying close attention to where they are stepping. This can lead to dangerous walking grounds for pedestrians. Since walking is a mainstream method of transportation for students on campus, it is important to keep it pedestrian friendly. Student injuries are a liability and can cost your college a lot of money, but they can be better avoided with proper pavement maintenance.

Enhance Bike Paths

Road striping is important to college campuses since many students also like to ride their bikes, scooters, hover boards, and skateboards to class. Bike paths should be specifically designated, especially for campuses that allow cars. Furthermore, bike paths should be brightly painted and clearly marked for all to see. Not only can they reduce traffic congestion, they protect bikers and pedestrians alike.

Implement Work on School Breaks

The best time to implement routine pavement maintenance for any school is when students are out on break. This makes it logistically easier for all parties, including the paving company, the school staff, and the student population. It gives the paving company room to work, while also preventing any student interruption or accidents from taking place. As you know, some college kids get a kick out of imprinting on wet pavement. To avoid this type of campus vandalism, have all work complete when classes are not in session.

Attract New Students for Enrollment

An aesthetically pleasing parking lot gives a customer a great first impression. It says something about pride, quality, and professionalism. The same feeling applies for new students visiting the campus to tour the school. If you are touring a college, and the first thing you see is a derelict parking lot or sidewalks in a dangerous state of depletion, would you still want to apply? If your college wants to attract new students to enroll, pavement maintenance is a great service.

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Tips For Writing a University-Level Essay

When you take the bold step to commence a university undergraduate course you are moving into a new realm of education, which in turn requires you to deliver a new level of academic work. This will involve giving presentations, completing research and writing university level essays. In order to meet the requirements of these essays there are a number of tips that you should follow which should set you on the track to academic success.

Firstly, remember that university essays should be well researched and contain lots of supporting evidence in terms of other people's previous findings. This supporting evidence could be in the form of a literature review or just quoting others' work throughout your essay. Any references to other resources must be credited appropriately. Be sure to follow your university's specific guidelines in this respect as valuable marks can possibly be lost just by not applying the correct referencing method, or by applying the right method incorrectly. It may pay to familiarize yourself with whichever style your university uses, before you even begin writing. A common referencing style is the Harvard system of referencing which has very strict rules about crediting authors, research papers and journals etcetera but your university should be able to provide you with tailored guidance.

Secondly, a university level essay should try to delve deeper than a college level essay necessarily would. It should stretch and question theories and allow you to add your own knowledge and opinions in order to draw conclusions, some of which may never have been drawn before. This means you can't just recite your lecture notes, there must be some individual application of knowledge, and this is a challenge that many new undergraduates struggle with.

As with all essays a university level essay should have a sound introduction, a thorough research and analysis section and sound conclusions. This should then be followed by a full reference list and a bibliography. Within all of these elements you should make sure that you format your work according to your university guidelines, this is good practice for when you come to writing your dissertation, as correct formatting and adherence to style guidelines could mean the difference between a first and a 2: 1, in the same way, any essay, whether written at university or college should be proofread, preferably by a third party, to ensure that it is free from any spelling or grammar mistakes. Following all of these tips will allow your university level essays to achieve the grades you deserve and give you a good foundation for when it comes to writing your dissertation.

Tips for Writing College Essays: Literary Analysis

Writers block. Talk about the number one time waster when it comes to studying and assignment completion in college. And let's be realistic here, it isn't just WRITER'S block, it is really PROJECT CREATOR'S block. Whether we are writing a paper, creating a PowerPoint presentation, a short video production, a website, or any time of major project in an English course, we eventually hit that brick wall of saying "what do I do next?"

Well, if you are participating in any sort of English class, whether it is literature, critical theory … etc. There is a good chance that you will run out of the creative juices at some point. The problem is that it can sometimes take FOREVER to get back in track, when you really just want to get the project done fast . So here's a quick set of steps you can take to get the creative ideas flowing again.

Consider the Big Picture

Just ask yourself the following question about the (literary analysis) topic you chose to write about.

What are the primary themes or big ideas that are represented in the text (s) I'm concerned with?

Simple, right? If you have narrowed the focus of your paper well enough, you hopefully don't have more than three of these. And those three should honestly be bridging up to an even bigger, singular idea. Anyway, take those ideas or that idea and take the next simple step.

Symbol Identification

English classes, and especially literature courses, are largely representing philosophy and world views (culture) through metaphor. This means that you can have a lot of creativity in your interpretation of a text. And you really can't be wrong, as long as you make a compelling argument for it. But here's the key to overcoming that writer's block …

Symbols are a KEY metaphorical tool of authors!

So, simply pick out some symbol – whether it is a character, a description, an item … etc. – that helps explain the text's or texts' attitude toward that big idea. Now you can get into an elaboration of a particular symbol and big idea within your writing. At this point, find a few quotes surrounding that symbol that help back up your position, and you've just crunched out another 250+ words in your paper. Also, add your own elaborations after each quote to explain how the quotes prove your argument.

Not only is this a great way to add some more description and elements to your paper, this same process can be used as a way to create your thesis statement:

– Just look for the big ideas,

-Find a symbol (or a few) that make a statement about that big idea,

-Then argue that the symbol represents your author's viewpoint on the big idea.

-Or maybe the author is satirizing that viewpoint. Use your own discretion here.

ACT Or SAT? Five Tips to Pick the Right College Entrance Exam

The SAT and ACT are both respected, nationally-recognized tests. Historically, there’s been a geographic divide between the two; nowadays, very few colleges require or prefer one test over the other. So which one should you take? Well, since you can’t really say one test is any easier than the other, that all depends on your skills and preferences. Basically, you should go for the one you’ll score higher on!

Here are some tips to help you make your decision:

1. Who says size doesn’t matter?

The ACT is a shorter test. The SAT takes a whopping 3 hours, 45 minutes, while the ACT comes out to a hefty 2 hours, 55 minutes, making the SAT about 30% longer than the ACT. Either way, you’re stuck taking a long test. If you have a ridiculously short attention span, then the ACT might be right for you, but realistically, after nearly 3 hours, why sweat an extra 50 minutes?

2. When in doubt, just guess… right?

The SAT has a guessing penalty – minus a quarter of a point for each incorrect response. Not so with the ACT. Guess away! So you should answer every question on the ACT, but on the SAT, you should just leave the answer blank when you can’t eliminate at least one answer choice. Does this make the SAT “harder”? Not really. With the right strategies, you can even make the SAT’s guessing penalty work to your advantage.

3. It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s superscore!

The SAT reports each of your three “subscores” separately-one each for critical reading, writing, and mathematics. So, many colleges will combine your best three subscores from all the times you’ve taken the SAT to make a “superscore.” In the past, schools would not do this with the ACT. Recently, however, many schools have begun to make ACT “superscores” too.

4. What is the difference anyway?

Both tests have a grammar, reading comprehension, essay and math portions. The ACT has an extra “science” section, but don’t worry. I used quotes because it’s really just another test of your reasoning skills – not much chemistry, physics or biology knowledge needed. Broadly speaking, the ACT tests skills that you (should have) learned in high school, while the SAT tries to evaluate your innate problem-solving abilities.

For example, the ACT math section tests a few topics that typically aren’t covered until pre-calculus. While the SAT leaves out these topics, its math problems generally have more complicated setups.

The ACT’s essay is optional, but some colleges require it anyway. Its essay topics are always questions of school policy, while the SAT’s essays deal with more abstract moral or philosophical issues.

In the critical reading sections, the SAT’s vocabulary is harder, but the ACT taxes your critical reading and analysis skills. The ACT English section gives you a couple of long passages with grammar and critical reading questions mixed together; the SAT tests reading and grammar separately.

5. You can’t know if you like it till you’ve tried it!

How do I know which test is better for me? Try them! Take some free practice tests online and see which one fits your fancy. Both the SAT and ACT offer practice questions or tests on their official websites.